Waitrose Pest Control Policy Version 3

Last year Waitrose joined many of the other supermarkets by introducing their own supplier standards. The latest document relating to pest control, Waitrose Pest Control Policy V3, was introduced in January 2015 and became effective immediately following it’s issue.

Many of our customers are part of the supply chain for Waitrose and consequently they are working to the new Pest Control Policy document. At Check Services Ltd we are naturally interested in the changes relating to the pest control section to ensure we can provide a service that complies with all aspects of the Policy. When the various supplier Codes of Practice are updated,  it is vital that our service, reporting systems and all our field staff adapt quickly to comply with the standards.

Technical support and detailed inspectionsService – Our Premier Specification is designed around the various supermarket / supplier standards and we quickly adapt it as necessary for the Waitrose Pest Control Policy as well as other specifications such as M&S Code of Practice; BRC Global Standard for Food Safety; Tesco Food Manufacturing Standard; Soil Association Organic Standard etc.

 

Pest Control Report 5

Reporting Systems – Our reporting system is designed and structured to provide a comprehensive documentation of our service as part of an Integrated Pest Management for our customers. In addition to this, our reporting format provides information in a way that allows auditors to easily find all the information they require.

Field Staff – Due to the high percentage of our customers who work to the Waitrose Pest Control Policy, all of our staff understand and are trained to carry out pest control in food production environments and part of this includes complying with Policy Version 3.

Please contact us using the side tab if you would like to know more about our services or wish to have a survey of your site.

TFMS Version 6 – Tesco Food Manufacturing Standard V6

Tesco’s latest Food Manufacturing Standard (Version 6) is available from the Tesco Technical Library (TTL) and certification audits are already working against TFMS V6.

Many of our customers are part of the supply chain for Tesco and consequently they are working to the new TFMS document. At Check Services Ltd we are naturally interested in the changes relating to the pest control section to ensure we can provide a service that complies with all aspects of the TFMS. When the various supplier Codes of Practice are updated,  it is vital that our service, reporting systems and all our field staff adapt quickly to comply with the standards.

pest-control-headerService – Our Premier Specification is designed around the various standards and we quickly adapt it as necessary for Tesco Food Manufacturing Standard (TFMS) as well as other specifications such as M&S Code of Practice; BRC Global Standard for Food Safety; Waitrose Pest Control Policy; Soil Association Organic Standard etc.

Trending of pest activityReporting Systems – Our reporting system is designed and structured to provide a comprehensive documentation of our service as part of an Integrated Pest Management for our customers. In addition to this, our reporting format provides information in a way that allows auditors to easily find all the information they require.

Field Staff – Due to the high percentage of our customers who work to the Tesco Food Manufacturing Standard, all of our staff understand and are trained to carry out pest control in food production environments and part of this includes complying with TFMS.

Please contact us using the side tab if you would like to know more about our services or wish to have a survey of your site.

Label changes for Rodenticides

Directions for use are changing on all Anticoagulant Rodenticide labels. The changes will be taking place over the coming year and should be fully in place by 1st June 2016.

The new label wording is being introduced following consultation with HSE and the subsequent introduction of a voluntary stewardship scheme for our industry. In tandem with the Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticide (SGAR) Stewardship Scheme there has been a change in the use of all SGARs. Label phrases that will be introduced refer to the locations where the products can be used and in future will be either ‘In and around buildings’ or ‘Open areas’:

‘In and around buildings’ –  shall be understood as the building itself, and the area around the building that needs to be treated in order to deal with the infestation of the building. This would cover uses in sewer system or ships but not in waste dumps or open areas such as farmlands, parks or golf courses.’

‘Open areas’ – There is no definition of this phrase in the UK but European Commission documents describe uses “around farmland, parks and golf courses” as typical of this. Also when “rodenticides are used to reduce impacts on game rearing or outside (i.e. in field) food stores (potato/sugar beet clamps)”. An open area is therefore one that fits neither of the two preceding definitions and is an urban, suburban or rural space that is not directly associated with a building.

IMG_0633

These changes will have an impact on where and when we will be able to use anticoagulant rodenticides.

Link for the new CRRU UK Code of Best Practice.

Link for the HSE Information Document.

 

 

 

 

BPCA Exec Board appoints Lewis Jenkins as Vice President of the Association

The Executive Board of the British Pest Control Association (BPCA) have appointed Lewis Jenkins (Managing Director of Check Services Ltd) as their Vice President for the next two years.

lewisThe Vice President role includes line management of the Chief Executive, responsibility for one or more functional areas of the Board’s activities as well as a ‘critical friend’ to the President, assisting in the development of policy.  The Vice President will also deputise for the President where required, including chairing and attending meetings, representing the Association at events, and producing written responses.

Lewis has been directly involved with the BPCA since 1999 and having served on the Service Committee for 10 years he was then voted onto the Executive Board in 2009.

When asked about the appointment, Lewis Jenkins said:

“Being a member of the Executive Board of the BPCA is extremely rewarding. The Board strives  to improve services provided by the BPCA for its members as well as delivering benefits to the pest control industry as a whole. The appointment as Vice President adds another layer of responsibility to my role including setting budgets and an enhanced role in developing the BPCA’s Strategy. Having been in the role for a few months already, I am really enjoying this new challenge.”

Warning to Look Out for Fake Pest Controllers

It has long been a topic of conversation among the more responsible personnel within the commercial pest control industry that there is very little control on the sale of pest control products or regulation for those wishing to set up and operate pest control companies.

In recent years BASIS-PROMPT have taken this issue and provided a register of trained professionals. Members need to keep up to date with continuous training or lose their accreditation.

All Check Services Staff are members of the scheme which is also now a prerequisite for BPCA (British Pest Control Association) membership.

Residents of Uttoxetter are being warned to look out for unqualified technicians.

Warning to look out for fake pest controllers in Uttoxeter | Uttoxeter News.

Commercial Pest Control – Myths Part II – The Giant Mutant Rat

Giant Mutant Super Rats! – A sensationalist headline?

In Part I of this series we discussed the headline- ‘Super Rats are Immune to Poisons’ ; in Part II we will look at media headlines claiming that ‘Plagues of Giant Rats are taking over the UK!’.

What are the myths and hype surrounding claims of giant rats in many areas of the UK? We will start with the photographic evidence commonly used in the media:

1. The Giant Rat being held up to the camera

Photos in the media regularly show  a person holding a dead rat up to show its large size. These photos invariably show a rat being held up using ‘waste nippers’ or some similar extending device. This then creates an illusion of increased size using ‘perspective’, a common camera trick. The photo below attempts to show how perspective can be used to create this illusion.

How perspective can alter the size of a 'Giant Rat'.

How perspective can alter the size of a ‘Giant Rat’.

If a giant rat had been caught then some form of scale would help to confirm the finding. Placing the rat on the ground and photographing it next to a ruler or tape measure would be an obvious and easy method; or even keep it for a few days in case anyone wanted proof (preferably stored somewhere cold!).

In all the cases I could find in the media, the rat had not been kept as evidence and the photos were misleading.

2. A different species?

Whilst the Brown Rat (Rattus norvegicus) dominates in the UK, other larger species of rat have been filmed with some misleading results. A quick search on YouTube and you can find a clip of a large rat sitting on a toilet with the headline ‘Giant Rat Emerges from the Toilet’. This video has been shown on many websites, with various headlines and here it is claiming to show a ‘Brown Rat’ (Rattus norvegicus). The rat shown in the video is actually a pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus) which can grow significantly larger than R. norvegicus and they are commonly kept as pets.

Whilst the pouched rat has become an invasive species in Florida, U.S., there are no confirmed colonies living wild in the UK.

More Information:

The Brown Rat (R. norvegicus) varies in size (body and tail) from approximately 12 inches (30cm) to as much as 18 inches (48cm). More information can be found following by this link to the BPCA website.

Commercial Pest Control and the Super Rat – Myths – Part One

‘Super Rats are Immune to Poison’

There is a huge amount of attention in today’s media regarding the rise of the Super Ratand this reinforces public fears that the country will soon to be taken over by ‘Super Rats’. It will not come as a shock to hear that there is a certain amount of hype regarding this, that the reality is very different and the science behind the story is often misinterpreted or ignored.

As commercial pest control experts we will try to explain what is really happening to the rat population and what a ‘Super Rat’ really is.

‘Rat poisons no longer work!’ has been a media favourite for some time now and whilst resistance to some poisons is certainly widespread, there are still a number of widely available rodenticides to which there is no known resistance – (100% kill rate). The problem is that these are licenced for ‘internal use only’,  so they cannot be used in most farm situations or in many public infestation scenarios.

Background to Rodenticides and the ‘Rise of Resistance’

The chemical warfarin was the first of the anti-coagulant rodenticides and was widely used as such from around the 1950’s. However in the years that followed at least one genetic mutation developed in rats this rendered the poison ineffective in some populations.  Continued use of Warfarin in areas of resistance has allowed these genetically resistant rodent  populations to spread. So the problem of resistance is by no means a new phenomenon. Warfarin and other early anticoagulant rodenticides became known as ‘1st Generation Rodenticides’.

New more potent forms of the chemical were discovered, mainly the compounds difenacoum and bromadiolone, termed Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (SGARs). It is these chemicals that are found in the majority of commercial pest control products available to buy off the shelf; unfortunately it is to these chemicals that a growing population of rats in many areas of the country are growing resistant to. A more detailed explanation of Rodenticide Resistance can be found in this article produced by the Rodenticide Resistance Action Group.

It must be clarified that the fact that a population has resistance does not necessarily mean that all the rats will be resistant; when a treatment is carried out the ‘normal’ rats will still be killed. Unfortunately, continually treating with rodenticides in areas of resistance will speed up the natural selection of the most resistant members, removing susceptible individuals and allowing the survivors to breed without competition.

The Future of Rodenticides

There is one major weapon left in the pest controllers arsenal – single feed anticoagulants.  A consultation is in progress at the moment to have Single Feed Anticoagulants licenced for outdoor use (with additional restrictions on when and how they are used). IF the professional pest control industry is allowed to use Brodifacoum and Flocoumafen rodenticides externally in controlled circumstances, this may be the answer to many of the ‘out of control’ populations that are causing so many people so much distress – the Super Rat is not invincible.

Pest control technician fixing an external monitoring point.

Pest control technician fixing an external monitoring point.

There are a number of other control options available to the trained pest control operative and as with most things if you have a problem it is always best to call in the experts. Pest control is a complicated business and a good BPCA approved pest control contractor is always going to do a better job than an amateur.

If you are commercial business and would like to know more about Check Services Ltd and our full range of services, please use the ‘contact tab’ at the side of this page.

Employee celebrates 25 years with Check Services

A presentation took place at yesterday’s six monthly company meeting  in recognition of Area Supervisor Bruce Harley’s 25 years of service with Check Pest Control.

Check Services Managing Director Lewis Jenkins congratulates and thanks Bruce Harley for 25 years of service

Check Services Managing Director Lewis Jenkins congratulates and thanks Bruce Harley for 25 years of service

Bruce, based in Peterborough, joined Check in 1989 and has seen a great deal happen during that time. The focus of his work in the early days was very much on fumigation, but now nearly all of his time is spent servicing large food manufacturing sites and he thrives on the kind of challenges this kind of commercial pest control presents.  He said ‘There have been a lot of changes but I have enjoyed every minute…no two days have been the same’.

Managing Director Lewis Jenkins said, ‘I would like to thank Bruce for his 25 years of dedicated work. Check Services rely on the high quality of our staff and it is though the commitment of employees like Bruce  that we are able to provide the service our customers expect.’

SoFHT conference on Rodent Control

On the 6th March 2014 the Society of Food Hygiene Technology (SoFHT) have organised  the event – Rodents and Rodent Control; Getting the Risks in Proportion Conference & Exhibition.

http://www.sofht.co.uk/events/rodents-and-rodent-control-getting-the-risks-in-proportion-conference-exhibition/

Rory Hope, Technical Director of Check Services Ltd will be one of the speakers. This should be an excellent event looking at various aspects of rodents and rodent control within the Food Industry.